Feminine Beauty Is Highly Controllable

The post that bears this title contains a table that I have duplicated below, along with some notes about how I generated it.


  1. I started with only the overall categories (the colored ones), since it was easier to start by gauging how much a woman's clothes mattered overall, rather than deciding that something as specific as the fit of her clothes, for example, was worth 3 %.
  2. I broke down the large categories into their various components, and ranked each one individually, ignoring the overall category score (despite the aforementioned difficulty).
  3. I totaled up the scores of the components in each category and compared that total to the overall score that I had intuitively given the category at the outset. If there was a large discrepancy (more than a few percent), I reconsidered the original overall category score, as well as the scores of the various components, adjusting either or both in order to make them accurate (and match).
  4. In order to check the result of step three, I then listed all of the sub-categories in descending order of importance, and worked my way down the list, making sure that the hierarchy of importance was accurate. So, for example, if step three had let me to rank hairstyle at 5 %, but this showed up on the ordered list below makeup, which I'd assigned a 7 %, I went back and made adjustments (because I know intuitively that hair is more important than makeup).
  5. I then iterated steps two through four until everything matched my intuition. The process was actually fairly enlightening, as it made me rethink some of the stereotypes I had assumed about the importance of some things (heels, for example), and reconsider the value of some other things I had thought were more important than they are (hair, for example).
  6. Finally, I ranked each sub-category for controllability. This was much simpler than ranking the importance of the various aspects of beauty because it is less a matter of opinion, and does not require the consideration of multiple examples in order to reach a conclusion. Some of these rankings are described in the original post.

4 comments:

  1. Andrew-how was #2 determined? The percentage breakdown seems spot-on. Also, what do you mean by leg/body ratio? I have long legs/ compared with my torso. A lot of men I know find women with long torsos very unattractive. Kind of surprusing that it was ranked as being so unimportant when it kind of makes people with longer torsos seem uneven/unbalanced.

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  2. Andrew,
    Can you do a post or comment on glasses on women, what men think of them? What's the preception difference if any on visible frames vs. frameless vs. no glasses.
    Thanks!

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  3. Juliet-good question! Just the other day I was getting a new pair of glasses and spent almost an hour debating about which looked cuter. I narrowed it down to "cute" and "smart" and I went for cute :) I also wear contacts (primarily) and would like to know Andrew's (ie the manosphere) opinion. I like wearing my glasses, but I find I wear them at home, when i'm grabbing coffee across the street, and just regular everyday errands. I go with contacts for parties, the gym, work, socializing, playing sports.

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  4. posture is usually not 100% controllable. Habits like this one tend to be hard to change and some may have scoliosis and muscular imbalances etc so that they naturally slump over and is not something you can change just like that.
    Also, apart from leg to body ratio, body shape is highly related to weight/fitness

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